Your Blog: Create a Business in 60 Minutes

Lazy Rich Blogger Fast Track

Blogging is amazing. It’s instant publishing. It can even become a successful business. Considering that most businesses require many thousands of dollars of startup funding, it’s wonderful that you can start a blog without any investment at all.

Let’s be realistic however. Most bloggers fail, as do 50 per cent of all small business startups. (A statistic from the U.S. Small Business Administration.)

However, since the primary reason for any small business’s failure is a lack of experience, you can be relaxed about your blog’s “failure.” Even if your blog is unsuccessful, you’ve gained valuable experience. The lessons you’ve learned will be priceless when you start your next blog.

Yes, your NEXT blog. Few bloggers are successful with their very first blog. There’s always a chance that your next blog may become a six figure business.

I started blogging in 2000. My early blogs have gone with the wind. They were on free hosts, and they died because I stopped adding posts. They’d served their purpose, however.

Not only did those early blogs teach me a lot about blogging, writing and myself, they also made money, although that wasn’t my intention. Those early blogs promoted my name to clients and publications which hired me.

Let’s look at how you can create a blog, which you hope will become a business, in 60 minutes.

1. Brainstorm Your Blog’s Subject — 20 minutes

Make a list of your interests and experiences. Everyone’s an expert on something. Some mommy bloggers have turned their preoccupation with their families into lucrative businesses, for example.

Even if you’re still at school, you’re an expert on high school. At the other end of the age divide, you’re an expert on life.

Choose the subject matter for your blog from your interests. Your blog must be interesting to you: if you’re not enthusiastic, you can’t expect others to be.

2. Research Your Audience — 15 minutes

Who will read your blog? Why? Visit social media sites and forums, and investigate your audience. If the audience isn’t online, you won’t have readers, so make sure that they’re online.

3. Write a Description of Your Blog — 10 minutes

Spend a few minutes describing the blog you’ll create. Please don’t omit this. I coach bloggers, and I’ve found that very few write a description of their business. Once you start blogging, and you’re trying to find time to post articles, gather information, and respond to comments, it’s very easy to lose track of your subject matter. When you do that, your blog becomes a mess, and you’ll lose your audience.

4. Brainstorm Topics — 10 minutes

What will you cover on the blog? Make a list of topics.

Brainstorm for ten minutes. Write whatever comes to mind. Don’t censor yourself.

5. Create the Blog — 5 minutes

You’ve got five minutes left. Sign up at one of the free blogging services and create the blog.

Using a free service is best when you’re testing a blog idea. You can move the blog to your own site later, if it’s successful.

There you have it: you’ve spent less an hour. Will your new blogging business be a success? It may well be. If it isn’t, you’ve won some priceless blogging experience — and your next blog will be the better for it.

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Angela Booth is a top copywriter, multi-published author, and writing teacher. She offers many guides, courses and classes to help writers to enhance their skills on her Writing Genii website. She also provides inspiration and motivation for writers on her writing blogs. Angela has been writing successfully since the late 1970s, and was online in the 1980s, long before the birth of the Web. Her novels and business books have been widely published.

About Angela Booth

Angela Booth is a top copywriter, multi-published author, and writing teacher. She offers many guides, courses and classes to help writers to enhance their skills on her Writing Genii website. She also provides inspiration and motivation for writers on her writing blogs. Angela has been writing successfully since the late 1970s, and was online in the 1980s, long before the birth of the Web. Her novels and business books have been widely published.